Knocking on Heaven's Door
by Sharman Apt Russell



Yucca Publishing, 2016. ISBN 978-1-631-58068-0.
Reviewed by Susan J. Tweit
Posted on 08/19/2016

Fiction: Paranormal; Fiction: Mainstream

Clare breathed in the smell of blood. Sharp, metallic, in the air, on her skin. She slipped her knife into the space between the joint and bone of the mare's hip—a small young female but still too much meat, more than enough for their next few days of hunting. Tonight she and Jon would feast on the rump with garlic and onion, some saltbush leaves, perhaps a mint paste... Clare felt happy thinking about her dinner. She felt...lust. A fervent yearning. Her mouth filled with saliva. A violent tenderness. Her heart expanded, blossomed, pressed against her ribcage so that she mewled without sound, kittenish. She slunk forward, barely in control, through the grass...

No, no, these were not her thoughts.

"Cat! Cat!" Clare yelled and stood, dropping the knife, picking up her spear from the bloodied ground.

It is the 23rd Century, about 150 years after a supervirus has wiped out almost every human being on Earth. The few survivors have recreated a "utopian" paleolithic hunter-gatherer lifestyle imbued with animism, informed by New Physics, and linked by solar-powered laptops (solarcomps) via the worldwide web.

Clare and her tribe live in New Mexico, moving with the seasons, feasting on abundant plants and wild game, and celebrating the cycles of nature. The only animals they do not hunt are the "paleos," once-extinct Paleolithic species reintroduced before the virus, creatures like the saber-toothed cat who intruded into Clare's thoughts and nearly killed her and her hunting companion at the beginning of the book. Many paleos are telepathic; as Clare says, "How could you hunt someone you could talk to?"

A widow whose young daughter died six years before, Clare has found comfort and meaning in teaching creative writing to students from around the world via the worldwide web. Now, one of her students, a younger man from her own tribe, has become her lover. Clare's life seems settled, until she is assigned to serve as quest-guide to Brad, a "lab rat" and theoretical physicist who lives in the relative comfort of what remains of the Los Alamos National Laboratory complex.

Brad, who discovered The Theory of Everything and whose mathematics describes how life could exist in "quantum non-locality," as holographic projections of actual cells. Brad, who has put off the required quest as long as possible, who prefers to think math in his office rather than hunt and sleep outdoors. Brad, who initially becomes interested in Clare simply a woman who might bear his children.

The quest the two set off on becomes so much more than a simple journey, bringing up classic conflicts: a life close to the earth versus a life of the mind, technology versus nature, organized society versus loners who live outside the culture, intuitive and sensory knowledge versus intellect, man versus woman. The story twists and turns through the landscape, through lives, through physics and Brad's risky experiment to win Clare as his own. The choices the two humans make in the aftermath of that experiment will shape their future and that of their people.

Science fiction generally doesn't interest me, but Knocking on Heaven's Door sucked me in and kept me hooked, immersed in a culture and characters I hadn't imagined I wanted to know. Sharman Apt Russell's imagined future manages to be both utopian and also startlingly contemporary, relevant and illuminating to our lives and choices today.


Sharman Apt Russell is a longtime professor at Western New Mexico University and Antioch University in Los Angeles. She is the award-winning author of numerous essays, short stories, and books, including Hunger and An Obsession with Butterflies. She has received the Mountains and Plains Booksellers Award, the New Mexico Zia Award, and the Rockefeller Fellowship. She lives in Silver City, New Mexico. Visit her website.

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